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Archive for the ‘Web 2.0’ Category

Opera competing in web landscape

February 9, 2010 2 comments

Opera has always been innovative in terms of features but i don’t know why it does not well stands in terms of user base 😦

See some unique features of Opera 10.10

Opera Unite [Use applications to share content with others in a quick and easy way.]
Opera Unite is a new technology platform allowing you to share content directly with friends, without having to upload anything to a Web site. You can stream music, show photo galleries, share files and folders, or even host your own Web pages directly from your browser.

Opera Link [Synchronize your Speed Dial, bookmarks, notes and other useful data.]
Opera Link™ is a free service that enables data sharing between all your computers and devices. It can synchronize your bookmarks, Speed Dial entries, notes and other useful browser information, so they are available to you wherever you go.
The first time you use Opera Link, Opera synchronizes your browser data to an online server. Any change you make in your browser is also reflected on this server. When you log into Opera Link with a second Opera Browser, all browser data from the online storage is merged with the browser data already in the new browser. If you delete a bookmark in the second Opera browser, this bookmark will also automatically be deleted on the online server and all copies of Opera which are logged in to this Opera Link account.

Opera Turbo [Boost your speed with our powerful servers to compress Web pages, so you get them faster.]
Opera Turbo is a server-side optimization and compression technology that speeds up data transfer and reduces the amount of data that needs to be downloaded in order to view the page by up to 80%. Among other means, the compression is achieved by image down-sampling therefore some level of distortion in graphics may occur.

Visual tabs
Drag the handle underneath the tabs to reveal thumbnails of your open Web pages.

Customizable Speed Dial

Get easy access to your favorite sites every time you open a new tab. Choose the layout and the background you prefer.

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What Is Web 2.0

June 3, 2006 Leave a comment

[Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software]

by Tim O’Reilly
09/30/2005

The bursting of the dot-com bubble in the fall of 2001 marked a turning point for the web. Many people concluded that the web was overhyped, when in fact bubbles and consequent shakeouts appear to be a common feature of all technological revolutions. Shakeouts typically mark the point at which an ascendant technology is ready to take its place at center stage. The pretenders are given the bum’s rush, the real success stories show their strength, and there begins to be an understanding of what separates one from the other.

The concept of “Web 2.0” began with a conference brainstorming session between O’Reilly and MediaLive International. Dale Dougherty, web pioneer and O’Reilly VP, noted that far from having “crashed”, the web was more important than ever, with exciting new applications and sites popping up with surprising regularity. What’s more, the companies that had survived the collapse seemed to have some things in common. Could it be that the dot-com collapse marked some kind of turning point for the web, such that a call to action such as “Web 2.0” might make sense? We agreed that it did, and so the Web 2.0 Conference was born.

In the year and a half since, the term “Web 2.0” has clearly taken hold, with more than 9.5 million citations in Google. But there’s still a huge amount of disagreement about just what Web 2.0 means, with some people decrying it as a meaningless marketing buzzword, and others accepting it as the new conventional wisdom.

This article is an attempt to clarify just what we mean by Web 2.0.

In our initial brainstorming, we formulated our sense of Web 2.0 by example:

Web 1.0 Web 2.0
DoubleClick –> Google AdSense
Ofoto –> Flickr
Akamai –> BitTorrent
mp3.com –> Napster
Britannica Online –> Wikipedia
personal websites –> blogging
evite –> upcoming.org and EVDB
domain name speculation –> search engine optimization
page views –> cost per click
screen scraping –> web services
publishing –> participation
content management systems –> wikis
directories (taxonomy) –> tagging (“folksonomy”)
stickiness –> syndication

The list went on and on. But what was it that made us identify one application or approach as “Web 1.0” and another as “Web 2.0”? (The question is particularly urgent because the Web 2.0 meme has become so widespread that companies are now pasting it on as a marketing buzzword, with no real understanding of just what it means. The question is particularly difficult because many of those buzzword-addicted startups are definitely not Web 2.0, while some of the applications we identified as Web 2.0, like Napster and BitTorrent, are not even properly web applications!) We began trying to tease out the principles that are demonstrated in one way or another by the success stories of web 1.0 and by the most interesting of the new applications.

For further reading please follow the original link of the article
http://oreillynet.com/pub/a/oreilly/tim/news/2005/09/30/what-is-web-20.html

Categories: Web 2.0